You are here: Gerhold Chemetals Co., Ltd NewsViews

Alumina chemical compound

  Some alumina is still produced by melting bauxite in an electric furnace, in a process devised for the abrasives industry early in the 20th century, but most is now extracted from bauxite through the Bayer process, which was developed for the aluminum industry in 1888. In the Bayer process bauxite is crushed, mixed in a solution of sodium hydroxide, and seeded with crystals to precipitate aluminum hydroxide. The hydroxide is heated in a kiln in order to drive off the water and produce several grades of granular or powdery alumina, including activated alumina, smelter-grade alumina, and calcined alumina.

  Activated alumina is a porous, granular substance that is used as a substrate for catalysts and as an adsorbent for removing water from gases and liquids. Smelter-grade alumina accounts for 90 percent of all alumina produced; it is transported to aluminum plants, where it is electrolyzed into aluminum metal. Calcined alumina is made into a variety of ceramic products, including spark-plug insulators, integrated-circuit packages, bone and dental implants, laboratory ware, sandpaper grits and grinding wheels, and refractory linings for industrial furnaces. These products exhibit the properties for which alumina is well known, including low electric conductivity, resistance to chemical attack, high strength, extreme hardness (9 on the Mohs hardness scale, the highest rating being 10).